Approaching Public Engagement: Sharing Early Modern Women in a ‘Plus One’ World

In September 2017 a short piece of my work was published by WorkandGender.wordpress.com as a foreshadowing of the conference papers being presented at the Invisible Hands: Reassessing the History of Work.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/invisible-hands-reassessing-the-history-of-work-tickets-43400044702?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=escb&utm-source=cp&utm-term=listing

I am reposting this blog from their page and am looking forward to presenting a portion of my dissertation in a paper titled, ‘Cartrages’, Cooking, and Cargo: Revealing Seventeeth-Century Women’s Work in Scotland’s Dream of Empire in Panama.

 

Gender and Work in Early Modern Europe

This post comes from Gina G. Bennett, a fourth year doctoral student of Transatlantic History at The University of Texas at Arlington. Her dissertation, under the direction of Dr. Kenyon Zimmer, will focus on the influence of women and the degree to which they participated as migrators, producers, labourers, and investors for The Company of Scotland Trading to Africa and the Indies in the transatlantic world in the early modern era. She holds both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in History from Texas A & M – Commerce.  Follow her on WordPress: GinaGBennett.com or Twitter: @GinaGBennett

Gina G. Bennet (The University of Texas at Arlington)

Like many readers of the Gender and Work in Early Modern Europe blog, we each are occasionally called to step beyond conferences, lecture halls, and speak outside academia. Often these events take place at a museum or civic building and often include a meal.  People of two sorts are in attendance, the ones choosing to attend and the extra…

View original post 1,072 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s